Posts Tagged ‘American Civil Religion’

Greetings from NYC, the city that can’t figure out what season it is.  Last week it was in the 80s.  Then it rained.  Felt like a windy, nippy, Autumn day today.  I wonder what tomorrow will bring…

The big news on the EAP front is that the application deadline for this course has been extended until May 15th.  So, for those of you who haven’t finished filling out those applications, you’ve still got a little over 2 weeks to wrap them up.  If you’re still on the fence about it, this gives you time to decide that you reeeeally want to come along on what will surely be a grand and exciting and educational trip!  If you’ve got any questions about the course, feel free to contact the Faculty leader- Professor Vivian-Lee Nyitray.

I’ve got some more preview photos from Washington, D.C. from some of the sites we’ll be visiting while we’re there:

This is the Newseum.  Can you read what’s written in stone on the front facade of the building?  Something we’ll be dealing with a LOT during our Washington, D.C. studies.  The Newseum is primarily a journalism and media museum (hence “News”eum), but there are also galleries entirely dedicated to 1st Amendment freedoms as well, which is where we’ll be primarily be hanging out.

And right down the street from the Newseum are the National Archives, which we’ll visit to take a look at some of the most important documents in American history like the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, etc…

So with that, make sure to finish up your applications and make sure to pack your umbrella, because we’re heading to D.C.!

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Hello everyone!

The weather’s been on the fritz here in New York…hot, cold, hot, cold.  I can’t figure out what season it is!  Speaking of seasons and weather and….clothes…..which leads to….packing, in the next 3 months leading up to the trip I’ll be posting some tips and info on what to pack for this trip.  For many of you, this will be your first long trip abroad, so stay tuned for info on what kinds of clothes to bring and what else you’ll need to stuff in your packs (adapters, converters, plugs, etc).

Also, just to let you know, I will be visiting Washington DC over the weekend to check out the current exhibits at the museums we’ll be visiting and taking another look at the monuments and memorials we’ll be seeing in August.  Photos to come!

Until then, here is the latest week in history:

April 12…

1861 – The first shots of the American Civil War are fired as the Confederates take Fort Sumter, South Carolina.

1961 – Soviet Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin becomes the first person in space (if you don’t count the US’s X-15 flight research program…but we can get into that later >yes I’m a space nerd<) aboard the Vostok 1.

April 13…

1829 – The Catholic Emancipation Act allows Catholics to sit in Parliament and hold public office in Britain.

1919 – British soldiers kill hundreds of unarmed Indian civilians during a protest in Amritsar, India.

April 14…

1865 – US President Abraham Lincoln is shot while at the theater in Washington, DC and dies the next day.

April 15…

1945 – British troops liberate Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany.

April 16…

73 CE – Roman troops breach the walls of Masada fortress to find the Jewish defenders have committed mass suicide.

1945 – The notorious high-security prisoner of war camp at Colditz Castle in Germany is liberated by US troops.

April 17…

1961 – A US-backed invasion of Cuba, made up of anti-Fidel Castro exiles, is defeated at the Bay of Pigs.

April 18…

1775 – The American War of Independence begins with the Battles of Lexington and Concord.  The British win both.

1949 – The Republic of Ireland comes into being, but the six counties of Northern Ireland remain part of Britain.

1986 – South Africa repeals the ‘pass laws’ restricting the movements of non-whites, enforced since 1948.

April 19…

1012 – Viking raiders kill Alphege, Archbishop of Canterbury, before being bought off with a huge bribe.

1943 – The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising ignites after German soldiers begin ‘liquidation’ of the Jewish ghetto.

April 20…

1945 – As Adolf Hitler celebrates his 56th birthday, Soviet shells fall on Berlin.

1968 – British politician Enoch Powell makes his notorious ‘rives of blood’ speech against immigration.

From National Native News:

During this week in 2009, Carrie Dann, a member of the Western Shoshone tribe, and Manny Pino, a member of Acoma Pueblo, were recognized for their work to protect sacred areas. Dann and Pino received the Human Rights Defenders award by the International Indian Treaty Council. They were honored during the Indigenous Peoples Struggles to Defend Sacred Places symposium held at San Francisco State University.

From the BBC:

On March 6, 1836, Mexican troops massacre the American garrison at the Alamo, an event that has entered US mythology.

On March 7, 1936, Hitler marches German troops into the demilitarized Rhineland in defiance of the Treaty of Versailles.

On March 7, 1945, U.S. forces capture the bridge at Remagen and cross the Rhine, overcoming Germany’s last natural line of defense.

This is an interesting Library of Congress online exhibition entitled “Religion and the Founding of the American Republic.”  It’s definitely worth a look as it relates to the American Civil Religion portion of our Summer course.

EXHIBITION OVERVIEW

*   *   *   *   *   *Encompassing over 200 objects including early American books, manuscripts, letters, prints, paintings, artifacts, and music from the Library’s collections and complemented by loans from other institutions, Religion and the Founding of the American Republic explores the role religion played in the founding of the American colonies, in the shaping of early American life and politics, and in forming the American Republic. The seven sections of the exhibition are on such provocative issues as:

INTRODUCTION

This exhibition demonstrates that many of the colonies that in 1776 became the United States of America were settled by men and women of deep religious convictions who in the seventeenth century crossed the Atlantic Ocean to practice their faith freely. That the religious intensity of the original settlers would diminish to some extent over time was perhaps to be expected, but new waves of eighteenth century immigrants brought their own religious fervor across the Atlantic and the nation’s first major religious revival in the middle of the eighteenth century injected new vigor into American religion. The result was that a religious people rose in rebellion against Great Britain in 1776, and that most American statesmen, when they began to form new governments at the state and national levels, shared the convictions of most of their constituents that religion was, to quote Alexis de Tocqueville’s observation, indispensable to the maintenance of republican institutions. The efforts of the Founders of the American nation to define the role of religious faith in public life and the degree to which it could be supported by public officials that was not inconsistent with the revolutionary imperatives of the equality and freedom of all citizens is the central question which this exhibition explores.