Posts Tagged ‘Holocaust’

Hi everyone~

First things first…I sent out an email to each one of you so we can start getting the whole group connected both on the blog and via email.  For those of you who’ve responded– thanks!  To everyone else, please let me know if we can share your email with the whole group and if we can post a short bio about you on the blog.

For those of you going through finals week right now, best of luck!

And now for this week in history:

May 23…

1798: The United Irishmen rebel against British rule in Ireland, but despite French help they are defeated.

1915: Italy switches sides and declares war on Austria-Hungary, in accordance with the secret Treaty of London.

May 24…

1943: Germany calls off the Battle of the Atlantic by withdrawing its U-boats from North Atlantic convoy routes.

May 25…

1521: The Edict of Worms condemns Protestant Reformation leader Martin Luther as an outlaw and heretic.

1963: Thirty two nations from the Organization of African Unity convene with the aim of ending white rule in Africa.

May 26…

1679: The Habaeus Corpus Amendment Act requires the showing of ‘just cause’ for imprisonment over 24 hours.

1948: The Afrikaner National Party wins the South African general election and introduces ‘apartheid.’

May 27…

1940: ‘Operation Dynamo,’ the mass evacuation of encircled British and French troops from Dunkirk, begins.

1941: The German battleship ‘Bismark’ is sunk by the Royal Navy, with only 110 survivors from its 2,192 crew.

1942: Reinhard Heydrich, an architect of the Nazi genocide, is fatally wounded by Czech partisans in Prague.

May 28…

1830: The ‘Indian Removal Act’–deporting Native Americans to West of the Mississippi–is signed into US law.

May 29…

1453: The Roman empire in the east comes to an end as Ottoman sultan Mehmet II captures Constantinople.

Advertisements

Hey there folks!  The applications are in and the group is set.  I’ll be contacting all of you shortly to do a brief introduction and get the ball rolling on communal activities (more group interaction with the blog, etc) but until I do that (most likely tomorrow) here is a “this week in history” to keep you busy!

May 10…

1940: The German invasion of the Low Countries (usually referring to either just the Netherlands or Benelux as a whole [Benelux = Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg]) begins, using a new military doctrine called ‘blitzkrieg.’

1994: Former political prisoner Nelson Mandela is sworn in as the first black president of South Africa.

May 11…

330 CE: Constantine dedicates his new capitol, Constantinople, formally shifting Roman power away from Rome.

1559: Religious reformer John Knox ignites the Scottish Reformation with a sermon at Perth, Scotland.

May 12…

1949: Soviet forces lift the blockade of Berlin, during which the Berlin Airlift made 278,228 supply flights.

May 13…

1943: The Allies secure victory in North Africa with the surrender of 250,000 German and Italian troops.

May 14…

1948: The British mandate for Palestine ends and the state of Israel is proclaimed by Jewish groups.

1955: The Soviet-dominated states of eastern Europe sign the Warsaw Pact military alliance in response to NATO.

May 15…

1252 CE: Use of torture in the inquisition of heretics is authorized by Innocent IV in his bull ‘Ad exstirpanda.’

May 16…

1943: The Warsaw Ghetto uprising is crushed by German troops and 60,000 Jewish people are shot or deported.

May 17…

1900: The British garrison at Mafeking, South Africa, under Robert Baden-Powell, is relieved after a Boer siege of 215 days.

May 20…

325 CE: Roman emperor Constantine calls the Council of Nicaea, the first ecumenical Christian council.

1940: A concentration camp is established at Auschwitz, Poland, under SS commandant Rudolph Hoess.

May 22…

1939: Hitler and Mussolini create the Axis with a ‘Pact of Steel,’ a 10 year pact of friendship and alliance.

2006: The break-up of Yugoslavia is completed when Montenegro narrowly votes for independence from Serbia.

 

And finally, since we’re hearing so much about Constantinople (and should be on the lookout for–questionable–portrayals or stereotypes of people in pop culture), we’ll end with some Tiny Toons in Turkey:

Hello everyone!  Sorry the blog hasn’t been updated more in the past few weeks.  Over here in NYC (where I >Shady the program assistant< am right now) I’ve been battling my 4th cold of the year and working long days, so I’ve neglected my blogging duties a bit.  But, I’m on the mend so you can expect more frequent posting from now on.

First order of business:

APPLICATIONS ARE DUE  ON APRIL 13 which is only 3 DAYS AWAY!

If you haven’t sent in your completed application, be sure to due so VERY soon.  If you have ANY questions or concerns about completing your application, get in touch with your campus EAP office or with our program leader, Professor Nyitray, ASAP.

There have been a lot of interesting stories involving religion in the news recently.  Every time one pops up, I update the “In the News” page with a link to the story.  It’s worth a look just because it’s interesting…but also because we will be returning to this list of articles during the course.  If you find one story that really strikes your fancy, keep it in mind for later.

Thanks for checking back in with the blog and I look forward to meeting all of you in 3 months.  To finish off, let’s go to…

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

April 3 

1917 – Vladimir Lenin arrives at the Finland Station, Russia, to assume leadership of the Bolshevik revolution.

April 4

1949 – The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) is signed into existence by its 12 founder nations.

1968 – US Civil Rights Leader Martin Luther King Jr. is assassinated by a white supremacist in Memphis, Tennessee.

April 6

1917 – The United States formally declares war on Germany, entering WWI on the side of the Allies.

April 7

1944 – Two inmates of the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz escape, to later reveal details of the genocide there.

April 8

563 BCE – Siddhartha Gautama (founder of Buddhism) is born, traditional date.

217 CE – The brutal Roman emperor Caracalla is assassinated while relieving himself at a roadside.

1904 – The ‘Entente Cordiale’ is signed by Britain and France, finally ending centuries of intermittent conflict.

April 9

1867 – The United States Senate reluctantly votes to purchase Alaska from Russia for just $7.2 million.

2003 – A massive statue of Saddam Hussein is toppled in central Baghdad as US troops capture the city.

This week in history from the BBC and National Native News:

March 16…

1988 – A chemical attack by Saddam Hussein’s forces on the town of Halabja, Iraq, kills up to 5,000 Kurds.

2011 – Navajo Code Talker Lloyd Oliver passed away. The 88-year-old was from Shiprock, New Mexico. He joined the Marines in 1942 and was one of the original 29 Navajo men who created an unbreakable code in their traditional language. The code was used to transmit messages in the Pacific during World War II.

March 17…

2003 – Britain and the US abandon attempts to gain UN backing for the invasion of Saddam Hussein’s Iraq.

March 18…

1992 – White South Africans vote overwhelmingly for an end to the racist apartheid system in a referendum.

March 19…

1179 – The Third Lateran Council of the Catholic church calls a crusade against the Cathar heretics in Toulouse.

1920 – American senators reject the Treaty of Versailles, ensuring the US will not join the League of Nations.

March 20…

1933 – The first Nazi concentration camp is completed at Dachau, near Munich.

2003 – ‘Operation Iraqi Freedom,’ the invasion of Iraq by US and British forces, begins with airstrikes.

March 21…

1556 – The first Protestant Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, is burned at the stake for heresy.

1918 – General Erich Ludendorff launches his huge spring offensive, which ultimately exhausts the German army.

1960 – South African police kill 72 people (majority black South Africans) protesting against identity papers in the township of Sharpeville.  The event has come to be known as the ‘Sharpeville Massacre.’