Posts Tagged ‘Iraq’

Hello everyone!  Sorry the blog hasn’t been updated more in the past few weeks.  Over here in NYC (where I >Shady the program assistant< am right now) I’ve been battling my 4th cold of the year and working long days, so I’ve neglected my blogging duties a bit.  But, I’m on the mend so you can expect more frequent posting from now on.

First order of business:

APPLICATIONS ARE DUE  ON APRIL 13 which is only 3 DAYS AWAY!

If you haven’t sent in your completed application, be sure to due so VERY soon.  If you have ANY questions or concerns about completing your application, get in touch with your campus EAP office or with our program leader, Professor Nyitray, ASAP.

There have been a lot of interesting stories involving religion in the news recently.  Every time one pops up, I update the “In the News” page with a link to the story.  It’s worth a look just because it’s interesting…but also because we will be returning to this list of articles during the course.  If you find one story that really strikes your fancy, keep it in mind for later.

Thanks for checking back in with the blog and I look forward to meeting all of you in 3 months.  To finish off, let’s go to…

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

April 3 

1917 – Vladimir Lenin arrives at the Finland Station, Russia, to assume leadership of the Bolshevik revolution.

April 4

1949 – The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) is signed into existence by its 12 founder nations.

1968 – US Civil Rights Leader Martin Luther King Jr. is assassinated by a white supremacist in Memphis, Tennessee.

April 6

1917 – The United States formally declares war on Germany, entering WWI on the side of the Allies.

April 7

1944 – Two inmates of the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz escape, to later reveal details of the genocide there.

April 8

563 BCE – Siddhartha Gautama (founder of Buddhism) is born, traditional date.

217 CE – The brutal Roman emperor Caracalla is assassinated while relieving himself at a roadside.

1904 – The ‘Entente Cordiale’ is signed by Britain and France, finally ending centuries of intermittent conflict.

April 9

1867 – The United States Senate reluctantly votes to purchase Alaska from Russia for just $7.2 million.

2003 – A massive statue of Saddam Hussein is toppled in central Baghdad as US troops capture the city.

This week in history from the BBC and National Native News:

March 16…

1988 – A chemical attack by Saddam Hussein’s forces on the town of Halabja, Iraq, kills up to 5,000 Kurds.

2011 – Navajo Code Talker Lloyd Oliver passed away. The 88-year-old was from Shiprock, New Mexico. He joined the Marines in 1942 and was one of the original 29 Navajo men who created an unbreakable code in their traditional language. The code was used to transmit messages in the Pacific during World War II.

March 17…

2003 – Britain and the US abandon attempts to gain UN backing for the invasion of Saddam Hussein’s Iraq.

March 18…

1992 – White South Africans vote overwhelmingly for an end to the racist apartheid system in a referendum.

March 19…

1179 – The Third Lateran Council of the Catholic church calls a crusade against the Cathar heretics in Toulouse.

1920 – American senators reject the Treaty of Versailles, ensuring the US will not join the League of Nations.

March 20…

1933 – The first Nazi concentration camp is completed at Dachau, near Munich.

2003 – ‘Operation Iraqi Freedom,’ the invasion of Iraq by US and British forces, begins with airstrikes.

March 21…

1556 – The first Protestant Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, is burned at the stake for heresy.

1918 – General Erich Ludendorff launches his huge spring offensive, which ultimately exhausts the German army.

1960 – South African police kill 72 people (majority black South Africans) protesting against identity papers in the township of Sharpeville.  The event has come to be known as the ‘Sharpeville Massacre.’