Posts Tagged ‘Jewish history’

Hey there folks!  The applications are in and the group is set.  I’ll be contacting all of you shortly to do a brief introduction and get the ball rolling on communal activities (more group interaction with the blog, etc) but until I do that (most likely tomorrow) here is a “this week in history” to keep you busy!

May 10…

1940: The German invasion of the Low Countries (usually referring to either just the Netherlands or Benelux as a whole [Benelux = Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg]) begins, using a new military doctrine called ‘blitzkrieg.’

1994: Former political prisoner Nelson Mandela is sworn in as the first black president of South Africa.

May 11…

330 CE: Constantine dedicates his new capitol, Constantinople, formally shifting Roman power away from Rome.

1559: Religious reformer John Knox ignites the Scottish Reformation with a sermon at Perth, Scotland.

May 12…

1949: Soviet forces lift the blockade of Berlin, during which the Berlin Airlift made 278,228 supply flights.

May 13…

1943: The Allies secure victory in North Africa with the surrender of 250,000 German and Italian troops.

May 14…

1948: The British mandate for Palestine ends and the state of Israel is proclaimed by Jewish groups.

1955: The Soviet-dominated states of eastern Europe sign the Warsaw Pact military alliance in response to NATO.

May 15…

1252 CE: Use of torture in the inquisition of heretics is authorized by Innocent IV in his bull ‘Ad exstirpanda.’

May 16…

1943: The Warsaw Ghetto uprising is crushed by German troops and 60,000 Jewish people are shot or deported.

May 17…

1900: The British garrison at Mafeking, South Africa, under Robert Baden-Powell, is relieved after a Boer siege of 215 days.

May 20…

325 CE: Roman emperor Constantine calls the Council of Nicaea, the first ecumenical Christian council.

1940: A concentration camp is established at Auschwitz, Poland, under SS commandant Rudolph Hoess.

May 22…

1939: Hitler and Mussolini create the Axis with a ‘Pact of Steel,’ a 10 year pact of friendship and alliance.

2006: The break-up of Yugoslavia is completed when Montenegro narrowly votes for independence from Serbia.

 

And finally, since we’re hearing so much about Constantinople (and should be on the lookout for–questionable–portrayals or stereotypes of people in pop culture), we’ll end with some Tiny Toons in Turkey:

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Hello everyone!

The weather’s been on the fritz here in New York…hot, cold, hot, cold.  I can’t figure out what season it is!  Speaking of seasons and weather and….clothes…..which leads to….packing, in the next 3 months leading up to the trip I’ll be posting some tips and info on what to pack for this trip.  For many of you, this will be your first long trip abroad, so stay tuned for info on what kinds of clothes to bring and what else you’ll need to stuff in your packs (adapters, converters, plugs, etc).

Also, just to let you know, I will be visiting Washington DC over the weekend to check out the current exhibits at the museums we’ll be visiting and taking another look at the monuments and memorials we’ll be seeing in August.  Photos to come!

Until then, here is the latest week in history:

April 12…

1861 – The first shots of the American Civil War are fired as the Confederates take Fort Sumter, South Carolina.

1961 – Soviet Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin becomes the first person in space (if you don’t count the US’s X-15 flight research program…but we can get into that later >yes I’m a space nerd<) aboard the Vostok 1.

April 13…

1829 – The Catholic Emancipation Act allows Catholics to sit in Parliament and hold public office in Britain.

1919 – British soldiers kill hundreds of unarmed Indian civilians during a protest in Amritsar, India.

April 14…

1865 – US President Abraham Lincoln is shot while at the theater in Washington, DC and dies the next day.

April 15…

1945 – British troops liberate Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany.

April 16…

73 CE – Roman troops breach the walls of Masada fortress to find the Jewish defenders have committed mass suicide.

1945 – The notorious high-security prisoner of war camp at Colditz Castle in Germany is liberated by US troops.

April 17…

1961 – A US-backed invasion of Cuba, made up of anti-Fidel Castro exiles, is defeated at the Bay of Pigs.

April 18…

1775 – The American War of Independence begins with the Battles of Lexington and Concord.  The British win both.

1949 – The Republic of Ireland comes into being, but the six counties of Northern Ireland remain part of Britain.

1986 – South Africa repeals the ‘pass laws’ restricting the movements of non-whites, enforced since 1948.

April 19…

1012 – Viking raiders kill Alphege, Archbishop of Canterbury, before being bought off with a huge bribe.

1943 – The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising ignites after German soldiers begin ‘liquidation’ of the Jewish ghetto.

April 20…

1945 – As Adolf Hitler celebrates his 56th birthday, Soviet shells fall on Berlin.

1968 – British politician Enoch Powell makes his notorious ‘rives of blood’ speech against immigration.

This week in history from the BBC and National Native News:

March 16…

1988 – A chemical attack by Saddam Hussein’s forces on the town of Halabja, Iraq, kills up to 5,000 Kurds.

2011 – Navajo Code Talker Lloyd Oliver passed away. The 88-year-old was from Shiprock, New Mexico. He joined the Marines in 1942 and was one of the original 29 Navajo men who created an unbreakable code in their traditional language. The code was used to transmit messages in the Pacific during World War II.

March 17…

2003 – Britain and the US abandon attempts to gain UN backing for the invasion of Saddam Hussein’s Iraq.

March 18…

1992 – White South Africans vote overwhelmingly for an end to the racist apartheid system in a referendum.

March 19…

1179 – The Third Lateran Council of the Catholic church calls a crusade against the Cathar heretics in Toulouse.

1920 – American senators reject the Treaty of Versailles, ensuring the US will not join the League of Nations.

March 20…

1933 – The first Nazi concentration camp is completed at Dachau, near Munich.

2003 – ‘Operation Iraqi Freedom,’ the invasion of Iraq by US and British forces, begins with airstrikes.

March 21…

1556 – The first Protestant Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, is burned at the stake for heresy.

1918 – General Erich Ludendorff launches his huge spring offensive, which ultimately exhausts the German army.

1960 – South African police kill 72 people (majority black South Africans) protesting against identity papers in the township of Sharpeville.  The event has come to be known as the ‘Sharpeville Massacre.’

MARCH 12

1881 – Mohandas Gandhi begins a campaign of civil disobedience against British rule in India

1938 – Germany occupies and then annexes Austria in the “Anschluss,” supposedly intended to re-establish order

MARCH 13

1881 – Tsar Alexander II is assassinated in St. Petersburg, ending reform and causing the scapegoating of the Jews

MARCH 14

1939 – At Germany’s insistence, Slovakia declares independence from Czechoslovakia, becoming a German satellite

1991 – The ‘Birmingham Six,’ jailed for killing 21 people in two IRA bombings, have their convictions quashed

And, from National Native News:

During this month in 2011, an honoring ceremony was held for the first South Dakota Secretary of Tribal Relations Leroy LaPlante. The Cheyenne River Sioux tribal member was named to the post to foster a better working relationship with the state and nine tribes within its borders. South Dakota Governor Dennis Daugaard created the cabinet-level position after taking office last year.