Posts Tagged ‘Protestantism’

Hello everyone!

Going back to Tuesday…

We started the morning with breakfast in the room and a short discussion of what we’d be doing for the rest of the week.  Then we all made our way down to Drift (near Janskerkhof in central Utrecht) where we had a wonderful lecture on the religious history of the Netherlands by Professor Henk Tieleman.

Andrew, Prof. Nyitray, Cori, Erin, Perla, Prof. Tieleman, Jason, and Angelique in the classroom at Drift – Photo by Shady Grove Oliver

From there we walked over to lunch under the Dom (in the Domplein) and tried wonderful Dutch specialties like uitsmijters (open-faced sandwiches with 3 over-easy eggs on top) and kroketten (soft gravy/meat inside a hard fried shell).  We weathered the huge summer storm under the lunch umbrellas and then walked to the St. Willibrord’s church, the most richly decorated church in the Netherlands.  It was built in 1877 in the neo-Gothic style.

St. Willibrord church – Photo by Jason Cardenas

At St. Willibrord’s we were taken around by a nice volunteer who made sure to point out all of the unique nooks and crannies inside the church (including the dual-facing pews that flip up and down so parishioners didn’t have to get up and change seats when the speaker would walk up and down the aisles).

St. Willibrord church – Photo by Jason Cardenas

From St. Willibrord’s, we walked under heavy skies to the Catharijneconvent, a peaceful former convent that currently has the largest collection of relics and religious artifacts in Europe outside the Vatican.  We had coffee in the museum’s cafe and talked about the pillars of Dutch society and what it means to be Protestant and Catholic in the Netherlands both historically and contemporarily.

An intrepid few walked all the way back to the Hotel Mitland from the Catharijneconvent before heading out for dinner later that night.

Next installment coming later tonight!

Tot straks! (See you soon!)

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Hi everyone~

First things first…I sent out an email to each one of you so we can start getting the whole group connected both on the blog and via email.  For those of you who’ve responded– thanks!  To everyone else, please let me know if we can share your email with the whole group and if we can post a short bio about you on the blog.

For those of you going through finals week right now, best of luck!

And now for this week in history:

May 23…

1798: The United Irishmen rebel against British rule in Ireland, but despite French help they are defeated.

1915: Italy switches sides and declares war on Austria-Hungary, in accordance with the secret Treaty of London.

May 24…

1943: Germany calls off the Battle of the Atlantic by withdrawing its U-boats from North Atlantic convoy routes.

May 25…

1521: The Edict of Worms condemns Protestant Reformation leader Martin Luther as an outlaw and heretic.

1963: Thirty two nations from the Organization of African Unity convene with the aim of ending white rule in Africa.

May 26…

1679: The Habaeus Corpus Amendment Act requires the showing of ‘just cause’ for imprisonment over 24 hours.

1948: The Afrikaner National Party wins the South African general election and introduces ‘apartheid.’

May 27…

1940: ‘Operation Dynamo,’ the mass evacuation of encircled British and French troops from Dunkirk, begins.

1941: The German battleship ‘Bismark’ is sunk by the Royal Navy, with only 110 survivors from its 2,192 crew.

1942: Reinhard Heydrich, an architect of the Nazi genocide, is fatally wounded by Czech partisans in Prague.

May 28…

1830: The ‘Indian Removal Act’–deporting Native Americans to West of the Mississippi–is signed into US law.

May 29…

1453: The Roman empire in the east comes to an end as Ottoman sultan Mehmet II captures Constantinople.

This week in history from the BBC and National Native News:

March 16…

1988 – A chemical attack by Saddam Hussein’s forces on the town of Halabja, Iraq, kills up to 5,000 Kurds.

2011 – Navajo Code Talker Lloyd Oliver passed away. The 88-year-old was from Shiprock, New Mexico. He joined the Marines in 1942 and was one of the original 29 Navajo men who created an unbreakable code in their traditional language. The code was used to transmit messages in the Pacific during World War II.

March 17…

2003 – Britain and the US abandon attempts to gain UN backing for the invasion of Saddam Hussein’s Iraq.

March 18…

1992 – White South Africans vote overwhelmingly for an end to the racist apartheid system in a referendum.

March 19…

1179 – The Third Lateran Council of the Catholic church calls a crusade against the Cathar heretics in Toulouse.

1920 – American senators reject the Treaty of Versailles, ensuring the US will not join the League of Nations.

March 20…

1933 – The first Nazi concentration camp is completed at Dachau, near Munich.

2003 – ‘Operation Iraqi Freedom,’ the invasion of Iraq by US and British forces, begins with airstrikes.

March 21…

1556 – The first Protestant Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, is burned at the stake for heresy.

1918 – General Erich Ludendorff launches his huge spring offensive, which ultimately exhausts the German army.

1960 – South African police kill 72 people (majority black South Africans) protesting against identity papers in the township of Sharpeville.  The event has come to be known as the ‘Sharpeville Massacre.’